Your Grandfather’s Sword

∴ A battlefield weapon ∴

You peel back the age-stained linen lining the cracked wooden chest, and there it is. Your grandfather’s sword. As strong and as strange as the man ever was.

Awe-struck, you run your fingers over the ridged leather grip, momentarily transported to childhood as the wine-drenched old war stories come flooding back.

Your grandfather said he was a a great war hero. He said this sword had won him battles. He said he’d been rewarded by kings and princes alike. If you thought it strange that most of these rewards were dented helmets, snipped rings and gold teeth, you didn’t like to say so.

You practice a cut to the air, the wide blade flashing brief and brilliant in a singular shaft of stale light. Oh yes, this sword may have its secrets – but it’s in your hands now.

∴ Specs ∴

Intentionally balanced like early two-handed war swords, this hefty longsword moves swiftly but has a LOT of presence in the cut. With correct angulation, the wide blade also provides good hand protection in the bind.

  • Weight 1.6kg
  • Point of balance 16cm from guard
  • Total length 131cm
  • Grip and pommel 30cm
  • Blade length 100cm
  • Blade width 5.5cm at base
  • 2.5mm HEMA-safe edges
  • Distal taper from 6mm to 2.5mm
  • Peined construction

∴ Notes ∴

The aesthetically distressed crossguard is made from heat-treated high-carbon steel, and the hollow pommel from mild steel. Both have been brass-plated and aged for an authentic adventurer look. To further emphasise the weathered nature of the sword, the blade has been browned to replicate the patina of neglect.

The hardwood grip is wrapped in string and veg tan leather, with a single riser to continue the central ridges of the blade, cross guard and pommel. Cord wrapping the top of the grip hints at old repairs to a much used tool…

Ready for an adventurer’s heirloom of your own? Get in touch to discuss your ideas.

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