The Warding Sword

∴ A Scholar’s Defense∴

You place the sword before the altar of Walpurga, wincing at the clatter of steel on stone. The Saint’s painted eyes look on serenely, with no hint of her namesake’s challenging smile.

For months you pored over the texts by half-light, characters becoming companions as you sliced the still air of your cell. You found skill in the Lady’s lessons, yes, but Truth as well. Perception. Judgment. Balance. Truths you will need to carry close on a journey such as this.

Smiling you retrieve your sword, fingers finding their familiar place between curved quillons and twisted pommel. You make the sign of the cross and then, on impulse, bring the broad blade to your shoulder, point up, in an unmistakable Walpurgis Ward.

As you turn to leave, you think you see the Saint’s eyes sparkle.

∴ Specs ∴

Conceived specifically for sword and buckler fencing in the style of Royal Armouries manuscript I.33., this Oakeshott Type XIV arming sword is based on an amalgam of period examples such as Moonbrand.

  • Total length 97cm
  • Blade length 80cm
  • Blade width at base 5.5cm
  • Distal taper 6mm-2mm
  • Grip length 10cm
  • Pommel 5.5cm
  • Quillon span 20cm
  • Point of Balance 9.5cm
  • Weight 1320g
  • HEMA-safe edges, flex and swollen tip.

∴ Notes ∴

Throughout my work on this sword I made great use of Roland Warzecha’s research, especially in terms of pommel orientation. This is twisted counter-clockwise to the same degree found on numerous original swords from this period. Both I and the swordsman who commissioned the sword are curious to see how this small adjustment will affect its use.

In addition, I added an engraving on the sword’s point of balance to echo similar embellishments found historically. Once again I found my inspiration for this amongst Roland’s recent research, and I’m grateful to share in his theories and discoveries.

The hilt is hardened carbon steel, the pommel of mild steel, and the hardwood grip is wrapped in string and oxblood leather. Construction is epoxied, keyed and peined together for maximum durability.

Looking for a slice of history? Get in touch to discuss your ideas.

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