The Infanteer Sabre

∴ A Brush with Battle ∴

The scene plays out like a horrific pastiche, scored by an arhythm of blades.

Strangely detached, you watch a British soldier sliced through by a French sword. The fatal blow’s deliverer gloats for a moment, before pride is shattered into stunned contortion. With all the force of his final fall, the dying man slices his sabre downward with such swift precision that the Frenchman’s skull is split in two.

An infantry officer finds you hours later, still rooted to the spot, staring at the two enemies slumped together. Following your haunted gaze, he walks over to the tangled corpses and slides the improbably bloodied sabre from between them.

“A good sword,” he says, casting it to the ground before you. “You do it proud, now, lad.” The glint in his eye looks nothing like kindness.

∴ Specs ∴

In creating this salle version of a late 18th Century British Infantry Sabre we made authentic weight and balance our priority, omitting certain details of the original to create a sleek historical sparring weapon at 736g.

  • Weight: 736g
  • Total length: 95.5cm
  • Blade length: 80cm
  • Blade width: 3-1.7cm
  • Grip length: 13cm
  • Hilt width: 17cm
  • Point of Balance: 13.5cm from cross
  • Sparring-safe edges, flex and swollen tip

∴ Notes ∴

The blade is lightly fullered along its length, with a 5cm curvature. The hilt is mounted with a slight forward cant, lending itself to the curve and balance of the blade.

The hardened and tempered carbon steel hilt features a curved knucklebow and rounded langets, and the hardwood grip is wrapped in black leather.

∴ Gallery ∴

Ready for a taste of the infantry? Get in touch to discuss your ideas.

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